Paediatric Speech and Language Therapy

within Greater Glasgow and Clyde (GG&C)

WHAT IS SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPY?

 

Speech and Language Therapy is offered to children and young people when their speech, language or communication issues are impacting on how they access the world around them. This means where these issues prevent them from participating, interacting and engaging with others. Problems may arise when children don’t understand language, struggle to put words together or cannot be understood by other people. Some children and young people might also find it difficult to use language to communicate appropriately and interact effectively.

 

The Speech and Language Therapy team also advises parents and other professionals on how to support speech, language, communication and eating/drinking and swallowing difficulties.

The Role of the Speech and Language Therapist

The role of Speech and Language Therapy is to provide assessment, intervention and support to children and young people (0 – 19 years/ school leaver) and their families where there is an impact from a speech, language or communication and eating and drinking/ swallowing difficulty on everyday life.

 

The Speech and Language Therapy team can offer advice and information to families, nurseries and schools. We aim to develop an understanding of the needs of children/ young people with speech, language and communication impairments. We will always give advice and ideas on how to support children and young people in their everyday environment.

 

The Role of the Speech and Language Therapy Clinical Support Worker

The Speech and Language Therapy Clinical Support Workers are part of the Speech and Language Therapy Service delivering intervention to children, young people and their families under the direction of a qualified Speech and Language Therapist.

 

Speech and Language Therapists will agree a therapy plan with you and the Support Worker will work with your child in clinics, nurseries, schools, or at home to carry out this plan.

 

Under the direction of the Speech and Language Therapist, Clinical Support Workers may also support assessment of your child by doing clinical observations at home or within a nursery or school.

 

The Support Worker will feedback regularly to the Speech and Language Therapist on the progress of therapy plan. The Speech and Language Therapist will retain overall responsibility of care for the child and young person.

Contacting Us

 

 

Speech and Language Therapy

West Centre

60 Kinfauns Drive

Glasgow

G15 7TS

 

Telephone Number: 0141 211 6180

  • North East and East Dunbartonshire

 

Speech and Language Therapy

Stobhill HSCP Offices

300 Balgrayhill Road

Springburn

G21 3UR

 

Telephone Number: 0141 201 3399

Gorbals Health & Care Centre

2 Sandiefield Road

Glasgow

G5 9AB

 

Telephone Number: 0141 201 5192

Speech and Language Therapy

Barrhead Health and Care Centre

213 Main Street

Barrhead

G78 1SW

 

Telephone Number: 0141 800 7117

Speech and Language Therapy

Aranthrue Centre

103 Paisley Road

Renfrew

PA4 8LH

 

Telephone Number: 0141 314 4601

Speech and Language Therapy Department

Port Glasgow Health Centre

Bay Street

Port Glasgow

PA14 5EW

 

Telephone Number: 01475 506005

Speech and Language Therapy

Vale Centre for Health and Care

Main Street

Alexandria

G83 0UA

 

Telephone Number: 01389 828265

Referral Criteria

Speech and Language Therapy aims to support children and young people up to school leaver age with speech language or communication needs that interfere with everyday life. If you are worried about your child’s understanding, talking, speech sounds or interaction, try our interactive questionnaires.

 

Alternatively, speak to your Health Visitor or Teacher or contact us using the links for your area if you need advice on referral.

 

If you are concerned that your child cannot swallow or chew, contact your Health Visitor or GP in the first instance.

Your Child’s Journey through Speech and Language Therapy

 

What we will do

We will assess your child. This may include talking to you, observation of your child, talking to others e.g. Health Visitor or teachers. Sometimes we may use tests to find out more detail about your child’s speech and language. We will discuss the findings of our assessment with you and may also share with other significant people involved in your child’s life e.g. teachers.

 

In discussion with you, we will agree a therapy plan. This may include advice and support to you and nursery or school. Sometimes we work directly with your child to achieve a certain target that will make a difference to your child’s communication in everyday life.

 

Some children will have a few contacts with Speech and Language Therapy services and others may need more ongoing contact.

 

When we have reached the end of our care with your child, we will discharge them from our service. We will give you a report or letter with our contact details and advise you on when and how to contact us in the future if your child’s needs change.

 

We will also discharge your child from our service if:

  • Our intervention is no longer helping your child to change
  • You can now manage your child’s needs without our help
  • The timing for our intervention isn’t right for your child
  • Your child no longer wishes our help or you or your child cannot work with us at the moment
  • You did not attend or cancelled two consecutive appointments

 

 

What we need from you

Parents and carers have a crucial role in supporting a child’s journey through Speech and Language Therapy and beyond.

 

Much of our intervention will focus on making sure parents and carers can provide support for everyday communication. If you are not able to work with us for any reason, please let us know as it might not be the right time for therapy for your family.

 

Part of your commitment to supporting your child, may include attending regular appointments, working with your child at home with materials that we provide or implementing our advice.

 

We have a policy of discharge following 2 missed appointments, please make sure that you contact us if you are not able to attend.

Speech and Language Therapy Care

 

Every child with speech, language and communication needs is unique. When we make a therapy decision, we will use approaches that we know work from our professional experience and research. We believe that the therapy plan should be focused on the needs of the child and their family. Results will be different for every child based on their own unique circumstances and motivation.

 

Treatment approaches are developed with the aim of enabling children, young people and their carers to maximise their skills and manage their own communication needs with support from the adults in their world. This is done by working together to agree a plan that is focused on what matters to a child and their family.

 

Our care will always include advice and support, it may also include home programmes or support packs for school. In some cases we may work directly with you and your child in one to one settings, in clinics, home or sometimes in schools and nurseries depending on your child’s needs.

 

Some children have long term communication difficulties that will not be resolved by attending Speech and Language Therapy. In these cases, we will support you and others in your child’s world to make the most of your child’s skills by giving advice and ideas to try at home and school.

Building Blocks

Most children develop speech, language and communication in a predictable sequence with each new skill building on skills already learned. Although we can expect these skills to develop within a given age range, children will progress through these stages at their own pace (have a look at the Child Development Timeline for more information). When thinking about your child’s level of communication, it is important to think about the basic skills that are needed to support them to develop. For example, if a child has only recently started using single words, they have a long way to go before their speech sounds will be fully developed no matter what age they are.

 

Some children with long term speech language and communication impairments may not develop skills at all stages.

 

Click for more information to find out more about why each building block is important for successful communication.

For More Information

Speech Sound Development

 

 

Screen Time

Tablets, 'mobile phones, TVs, laptops and computer games consoles are everywhere and most of us couldn’t do without them!

 

We all know that allowing your child screen time sometimes feels like the only way parents can get things done. Giving your child access to a tablet or phone is often a surefire way of keeping them happy and busy whilst you get on with other things.

 

But did you know that too much Screen Time could have an impact on your child’s language development?

 

Click on the leaflet for more information.

 

  

For More Information

Dummies and Speech Development

Many parents use a dummy to help soothe their child. This is understandable as most babies have a strong sucking reflex and often a dummy can help settle a child. Dummies can be an invaluable support to parents and babies in the early months of development.

 

However, did you know that prolonged use of a dummy can cause potential risks to the development of speech and language?

 

Click on the leaflet for more information.

Stammering Advice Line

Top Tips

Attention and Listening

 

Play

Downloadable Copy

Talking

 

 

Try these simple tips to get the most out of talking times with your pre-school child!

Downloadable Copy

Helping Your Child with Unclear Speech

Top tips on helping your child with unclear speech.

Helping a Pre-School Child Whose Speech is Non-Fluent

Some children, when they are learning to talk, can stumble over words/pause and start again etc. This can sound like a stammer. Between the ages of two and five years it is normal for a child to repeat words and phrases or hesitate while they are thinking of what they are trying to say. Many children will become more fluent as they get older but others can continue to get stuck and find talking difficult.

 

It is important to seek advice and information on how to help as soon as you notice your child becoming non-fluent.

Children Who Are Learning Two or More Languages

A bilingual child is one who hears or speaks two or more languages (multi-lingual).

 

Many young people successfully learn more than one language in their pre-school years at home. Many children learn one language at home and then go on to learn English as an additional language when they start nursery or school.

 

Advice for parents of children who are exposed to more than one language.

Stammering Information - The Young School Aged Child

Many young children speak dysfluently at times, especially when they are under some pressure to speak. There is no exact point at which normal dysfluency becomes stammering though there are features which enable us to decide between normal non-fluency and stammering.

 

Normal non-fluencies are usually relaxed repetitions, often of whole words either at the beginning of a phrase or when a child is thinking of how to finish a sentence.

 

There is a greater risk of stammering developing when the child often gets stuck on words, prolonging or repeating part of the words or putting excess effort into finishing them. It is also a concern when the child seems aware of and upset by their dysfluencies. However, one of the things that make it so difficult to say with certainty whether or not a child stutters is that there can be so much variation from day to day and in differing situations.

Stammering Information - The Older School Aged Child

By now the child who stammers may have been stammering for some time. Some children may stammer with obvious physical tension and some may have mild, infrequent non-fluencies such as repetitions and sound prolongations.

 

To speak fluently children need to: know lots of words, know how to put words together (grammar); think quickly of the “right word” or correct sentence to say what they mean; listen and understand what others say; learn which sounds we use in our language and how they are put together to form words. They also need to coordinate the movements for breathing and speaking. These skills are affected by how the child feels as well as by the demands placed on him. When the child feels: happy, confident, listened to, sure of the content etc.., then it is easier to speak well. When the child feels: upset, tired, unwell, over-excited, unimportant etc.., then speaking can be difficult. Depending on these factors breaks in fluency can be expected.

 

You are not the cause of your child’s stammering but you are the best people to help their talking get easier.

Advice for Education Staff

Stammering Information - The Young School Aged Child

Many young children speak dysfluently at times, especially when they are under some pressure to speak. There is no exact point at which normal dysfluency becomes stammering though there are features which enable us to decide between normal non-fluency and stammering.

 

Normal non-fluencies are usually relaxed repetitions, often of whole words either at the beginning of a phrase or when a child is thinking of how to finish a sentence.

 

There is a greater risk of stammering developing when the child often gets stuck on words, prolonging or repeating part of the words or putting excess effort into finishing them. It is also a concern when the child seems aware of and upset by their dysfluencies. However, one of the things that make it so difficult to say with certainty whether or not a child stutters is that there can be so much variation from day to day and in differing situations.

Stammering Information - The Older School Aged Child

By now the child who stammers may have been stammering for some time. Some children may stammer with obvious physical tension and some may have mild, infrequent non-fluencies such as repetitions and sound prolongations.

 

A particular concern for teachers is the child’s reactions to his stammering and the reactions of others in the classroom. How should the child be expected to participate in class? The answer to this question depends on the individual child. At one end of the scale is the child who may be quite unconcerned and happy to participate like any other child; at the other end there is the child who will avoid speaking at all costs. Most are somewhere in between. If the child is attending Speech & Language Therapy then the therapist will let you know about particular strategies. It is important for the parents and teachers involved to have a discussion with the child to find ways to encourage them to participate without putting too much pressure on them. Sometimes participation requirements become part of the child’s IEP/ASP.

GIMMEE 5! Top Tips for a Communication Inclusive School

 

Stammering Guidance within Education Services Leaflet

 

Downloadable Leaflet

Speech Language and Communication Needs: Supporting Vocabulary

Young people with speech, language and communication needs, often struggle with learning and retaining new vocabulary in secondary schools. They need regular revision and repetition of new concepts.

Supporting Students with Speech Language and Communication Needs in the Secondary School

Most classroom teaching at secondary school level, is delivered orally. Teachers talk through new material, give verbal instructions, students ask questions out loud to clarify points or find new information. In addition feedback or revision of previous learning is most often given verbally. If a young person has compromised speech, language or communication they may struggle to understand and learn appropriately within a predominantly oral learning environment.

 

The good news is that simple adaptations to the curriculum, learning environment and the language used by teachers in the classroom can make a big difference.

 

Six approaches have been shown to work effectively in reducing the impact of speech, language and communication needs (SLCN). Many of these will be familiar to you however the best results will be achieved if all are used consistently across curricular areas.

Useful Websites for Information

Afasic

    www.afasic.org.uk

  • This website seeks to raise awareness and create better services and provision for children and young people with speech and language difficulties.
  • It contains helpful information on speech, language and communication needs (SLCN).
  • There is also a helpline for parents: 0300 666 9410.

 

 

Ambitious about Autism

        www.ambitiousaboutautism.org.uk

  • This is a national charity website which provides practical information and resources. It was designed for adults with autism, parents and professionals.
  • You can read other people’s stories and there’s an online community called ‘Talk about Autism’.

 

 

Autism Toolbox

    www.autismtoolbox.co.uk

  • This is a resource for Scottish schools which includes real life case studies and gives practical examples.
  • There is a guide to interventions and support for people on the autism spectrum.

 

 

Baby Buddy

    www.nhs.uk/apps-library/baby-buddy/

  • This can be accessed through a computer or using an app
  • It guides you through your pregnancy journey and the first six months following your baby’s birth.
  • It is designed to help you look after your baby's mental and physical health, as well as your own, and give your baby the best start in life. It includes helpful advice, tips and videos including come focus on communication.

 

 

British Stammering Association

    www.stamma.org

  • This website provides information, which is downloadable, for people who stammer, parents and professionals working with people who stammer.
  • The website aims to bring people who stammer together and there’s a link to their Facebook page and a list of upcoming events.
  • There is also a helpline available: 0808 802 0002.

 

 

Communication Trust

      www.thecommunicationtrust.org.uk

  • It’s a coalition of non-profit organisations aiming to support everyone working with children with speech, language and communication needs.
  • Has a separate resource sections for professionals and parents/carers.
  • Has a short speech, language and communication CPD online course.

 

 

Makaton

    www.makaton.org

  • This will provide you with an overview of Makaton and how this supports children with communication difficulties.
  • Makaton uses speech with signs and symbols to help people communicate. It can be used to develop communication, language and literacy skills.
  • You could also follow Makaton on social media for weekly sign videos.

 

 

National Autistic Society

    www.autism.org.uk

 

  • Aims to provide individuals with autism and their families with help, support, and services they can access.
  • There is an online community and resources and advice for teachers.
  • The website provides sensory advice on topics such as eating and drinking.

 

 

Play Talk Read – Parent Club

    www.parentclub.scot/articles/play-talk-read

  • The Read Talk Play campaign encourages parents to read, talk and play to their young children. It provides practical advice for parents to support their child’s learning and development.

 

 

SMiRA

    www.selectivemutism.org.uk/

  • This website provides information advice and resources on how you can support children who are selectively mute.

 

 

Talk To Your Baby

    www.literacytrust.org.uk/talk_to_your_baby

  • A campaign run by the National Literacy Trust which encourages parents and to talk more to children from birth to three.
  • Have a look at this website for a range of useful resources, including advice plus lots of songs and rhymes!

 

 

Talking Point

    www.talkingpoint.org.uk

  • This website provides information for parents/ carers and practitioners to help children develop their speech, language and communication skills.
  • It has a progress checker to act as a guide and there are factsheets available for download.