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Equality, Diversity and Human Rights

Equality, Diversity and Human Rights

The Equality Act (2010) was introduced by the Government to ensure public organisations promote equality and remove discrimination in the delivery of all their functions. Understanding, identifying and addressing inequalities is at the heart of NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde’s approach to providing effective health care to all.

 

Under the Equalities Act 2010, it is illegal to discriminate against individuals with certain protected characteristi...

Under the Equalities Act 2010, it is illegal to discriminate against individuals with certain protected characteristics. The law defines the groups of protected characteristics as:

 

  • Age

  • Disability

  • Gender reassignment

  • Marriage and civil partnership

  • Pregnancy and maternity

  • Race

  • Religion or belief

  • Sex

  • Sexual orientation

     

Many of us have more than one of these protected characteristics.

Equality is described by the Equality and Human Rights Commission as ‘ensuring that every individual has an equal opp...

Equality is described by the Equality and Human Rights Commission as ‘ensuring that every individual has an equal opportunity to make the most of their lives and talents, and believing that no one should have poorer life choices because of where, what or whom they were born, or because of other characteristics.’ 

Managing diversity is defined as ‘valuing everyone as an individual’, recognising that a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach to managing people does not achieve fairness and equality of opportunity, given that people have different needs, values and beliefs. 

Human rights are defined as ‘the basic rights and freedoms to which all humans are entitled’. They ensure that people are treated fairly and with dignity and respect. (Human Rights Act 1998)

Every individual has a unique contribution to make to our organisation. By treating each other with respect, we promote an environment where staff work as one team, improve outcomes and put patients first.

Under the Equality Act 2010 people are not allowed to discriminate, harass or victimise another person because they h...

Under the Equality Act 2010 people are not allowed to discriminate, harass or victimise another person because they have any of the protected characteristics. There is also protection against discrimination where someone is perceived to have one of the protected characteristics or where they are associated with someone who has a protected characteristic.

  • Discrimination means treating one person worse than another because of a protected characteristic (known as direct discrimination) or/

  • Putting in place a rule or policy or way of doing things that has a worse impact on someone with a protected characteristic than someone without one, when this cannot be objectively justified (known as indirect discrimination).

  • Harassment includes unwanted conduct related to a protected characteristic which has the purpose or effect or violating someone’s dignity or which creates a hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment for someone with a protected characteristic.

  • Victimisation is treating someone unfavourably because they have taken (or might be taking) action under the Equality Act or supporting somebody who is doing so.

You can find out more about the law and the protected characteristics on the Equalities in Health website You can s...

You can find out more about the law and the protected characteristics on the Equalities in Health website

You can sign up for regular updates on equality issues by emailing CITadmin@ggc.scot.nhs.uk