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Covid-19 (Coronavirus)

Information and guidance for public, NHSGGC staff, and community-based services.  Hospital visiting restrictions now in place.

Starting Solids - weaning your baby

Is your baby around 12 weeks old? If so then you can expect to receive an invitation soon, from you Health Visitor, to your local Starting Solids Session.

Starting Solids Sessions help make weaning fun for you and your baby. Look out for your invite or ask your Health Visitor for further information. If you can't attend a session you are invited to then please feel free to attend any of the events on any dates. 

We offer lots of sessions across the city with tips and advice on;

 

  • Preparing to start offering your baby first foods at 6 months old
  • How to prepare healthy food your baby will love
  • Looking after babies’ teeth
  • Encouraging your baby’s language development
  • Loads more

 

A variety of NHS Health Professionals and our colleagues from local organisations come along to provide you with any information and advice you may need, and it’s a great chance to meet and chat with other parents and carers also. We have a community chef who provides a live demonstration to show you how easy it is to prepare healthy first foods for your baby that are kind on your wallet too.

Mums, Dads, carers, Grannies and Granda’s (and of course, babies!) are all welcome.

The Starting Solids sessions are throughout Glasgow City, at the venues and dates as listed in the Links on this page. Your Health Visitor will invite you to attend when your baby is around 12 weeks old, but attending any time before 6 months is fine and you are able to attend as many sessions as you would like, in any location/venue which is best for you. 


 

Carry on reading for information about starting your baby on solid foods.......

In the first six months: Babies can get all the fluid and nutrients they need from breastmilk or from infant formula. There is no need to introduce any other foods before this time.

When is my baby ready? Every baby is different but the evidence tells us that babies aged around 6 months old, who show signs of developmental readiness, are ready to begin introducing solid foods alongside breastmilk or infant formula. The signs of developmental readiness are described below:

  • Your baby is able to stay in a sitting position and hold their head steady
  • Your baby can co-ordinate their eyes, hand and mouth so that they can look at the food, pick it up and put it in their mouth all by themselves
  • Your baby is able to swallow food. Babies who are not ready will generally push food back out of their mouth, although this is not possible for baby to do with some pureed food
  • Come along to a Starting Solids session to find out more!

 Session details can be found below for respective parts of Glasgow City;

 

North East Glasgow

 

Glasgow Starting Solids Sessions

Please note that all sessions begin at the stated time and are not "drop in"

Why wait until around 6 months to introduce solid foods?

- Breast milk or first infant formula provide the energy and nutrients your baby needs until they're around 6 months old (with the exception of vitamin D in some cases).

- If you're breastfeeding, feeding only breast milk up to around 6 months of age will help protect your baby against illness and infections.

- Waiting until around 6 months gives your baby time to develop so they can cope fully with solid foods. This includes solid foods made into purées, cereals and baby rice added to milk.Your baby will be more able to feed themselves.

- Your baby will be better at moving food around their mouth, chewing and swallowing it. This may mean they'll be able to progress to a range of tastes and textures (such as mashed, lumpy and finger foods) more quickly, and may not need smooth, blended foods at all.

- If your baby was born prematurely, ask your health visitor or GP for advice on when to start introducing solid foods.

Equipment Checklist

- High chair. Your baby needs to be sitting safely in an upright position (so they can swallow properly). Always use a securely fitted safety harness in a high chair. Never leave babies unattended on raised surfaces.

- Plastic or pelican bibs. It's going to be messy at first

- Soft weaning spoons are gentler on your baby's gums

- Small plastic bowl. You may find it useful to get a special weaning bowl with a suction base to keep the bowl in place

- First cup. Introduce a cup from around 6 months and offer sips of water with meals. Using an open cup or a free-flow cup without a valve will help your baby learn to sip and is better for their teeth

- A messy mat or newspaper sheets under the high chair to catch most of the mess

- Plastic containers and ice cube trays can be helpful for batch cooking and freezing small portions